WORDSWORTHS TINTERN ABBEY AS A THESIS POEM

WORDSWORTHS TINTERN ABBEY AS A THESIS POEM

Attention to this dimension of the poem has perhaps been preempted by the historicist accounts of the poem. As Johnston has put the question more recently, referring to the location issue, “Where one stands now on ‘Tintern Abbey’ makes a big difference in Romantic scholarship”: It belongs, along with other 19 poems by this author and four by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, to Lyrical Ballads , which is considered to be the inaugural book of the Romantic English Poetry. Such a spirit fails to account for the vagrants and the beggars, or the polluted stream of the Wye. The connection of these lines with “Tintern Abbey” is also shown incidentally by his adoption of the phrase “beauteous forms” at line 22 in revising the poem. Wordsworth, Prose Works , ed. Eric Birdsall Ithaca and London:

The fragment suggests something of how the image of the Wye came to mean so much more to Wordsworth in the years after than his first predominantly picturesque encounter could have meant at the time. Several earlier commentators on the poem, such as Christopher Salvesen, Alan Grob, and John Beer, have offered suggestions on the importance of the landscape and its figurative role that I will mention only in passing. The concept is borrowed in part from Schelling. The last important part is the one in which the Hermit appears since it is about a person who chooses to live separately, on his own, for religious reasons: Following the recent emergence of green readings of Romantic poetry, however, it seems appropriate to return to this poem and reconsider some of the arguments about the place of nature in it, and what the Wye valley specifically might have offered Wordsworth. Let the moon shine on her solitary walk, and let the mountain winds blow their breeze on her.

The poet has expressed his tender feeling towards nature.

Locating Wordsworth: “Tintern Abbey” and the Co – Romanticism on the Net – Érudit

While at this point in history our view of nature may not permit us to “see into the life of things,” this essay will review the psychic geography of the poem that led Wordsworth to think he may have done so. Alighting, he ascended the “majestic rocks” of the Symonds Yat promontory. In his account the place is called the New-Weir: Blamire,p. It may be noted that in the order of his phrases he recreates the process of observation: It somewhat changed him spiritually and even changed his point of view on the city life.

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It is not surprising that Wordsworth should have erased what he was in —tormented by his impotent hostility to his own country’s policies, by his responsibility to Annette and their child. He feels a sensation of love for nature in his blood.

wordsworths tintern abbey as a thesis poem

He describes the view: In this respect Wordsworth shows to what extent he has superseded the picturesque mode of viewing that largely predominated in The last important part is the one in which the Hermit appears since it is about a person who chooses to live separately, on his own, for religious reasons: He is reminded of the pictures of the past visit and ponders over his future years. He goes on describing what he sees: That Wordsworth had been thinking about this effect of nature on the mind is shown by a notebook fragment probably written earlier in between January and March, which offers a description of the process and rhythm of eloignment I have slightly simplified the lines as given by James Butler from the Alfoxden Notebook: The river is wider, than usual, in this part; and takes a sweep round a towering promontory of rock; which forms the side-screen on the left; and is the grand feature of the view.

Indeed, by the end of the passage not just the individual objects but the entire landscape seems to dissolve before our eyes. The hedgerows are an essential, if minor, component of the scene that Wordsworth lays before us.

wordsworths tintern abbey as a thesis poem

But his second characterization of the landscape that haunted him fits the New-Weir more precisely. He also describes that the cliffs and landscape seems to be connected to his spirit. On the contrary, he has changed since he has last visit to that place.

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wordsworths tintern abbey as a thesis poem

The whole river, at this place, makes a precipitate fall; of no great height indeed; but enough to merit the title of a cascade: Reassessing the significance of these aspects of the poem, however, will not restore the idealist readings that the historicist critics found problematic; rather, it will suggest that a more direct and intimate understanding of nature is encoded by Wordsworth’s poem.

Egerton,p. In the past the soundings haunted him like a passion.

More important, the process wordsworts through natural objects here anticipates the modifying process occurring in memory that Wordsworth goes on to describe in the second paragraph. The fragment suggests something of how the image of the Wye came to mean so much more to Wordsworth in the years after than his first predominantly picturesque encounter could have meant at the time.

Wordsworth tintern abbey as a thesis poem

University of Wlrdsworths Press, Wordsworth, Prose Worksed. Eric Birdsall Ithaca and London: He can see the entirely natural cliffs and waterfalls; he can see the hedges around the fields of the people; and he can see wreaths of smoke probably coming from some hermits making fire in their cave hermitages.

These trivial alterations may greatly add to the beauty of his composition. The connection of these lines with “Tintern Abbey” is also thesiw incidentally by his adoption of the phrase “beauteous forms” at line 22 in revising the poem.

Among the many interpretive issues raised by the poem, I will mention three that are representative: To master the essence of nature, the natura naturansColeridge argued that “the Artist must first eloign himself from nature in order to return to her with full effect,” [41] just as Wordsworth has done in the five years between his two visits.